Optics – Three polarizers with 1 moving

1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
Thee linear polarizers are in sequence. Let first and last polarizer be crossed (perpendicular to each-other) and the middle polarizer rotate with angular frequency ##\omega##. Show that under such circumstances, ##I## is given by: $$I = I_0 \frac{1}{16}(1-\cos (4\omega t))$$

Please, see the following link (yes, my paint skills are horrible! I tried to make it in inkspace, but I don’t know how to work with that program yet!): http://ift.tt/1ooRRRx

2. Relevant equations

Malus Law, which is given by ##I(\theta) = I_0 \cos^2 (\theta)##

3. The attempt at a solution

If you saw the following link, you noticed two angles, ##\theta## and ##\alpha##.

I think ##\theta=\omega t ## and ##\alpha = 90 – \omega t##

So, after the first polarizer:

$$I_1= \frac{I_0}{2}$$

After the second polarizer:

$$I_2= I_1 \cos^2 (\omega t)$$

After the third polarizer:

$$I_3 = I_2 \cos^2 (90-\omega t)$$

I can play around with that but I never arrive at the ##I = I_0 \frac{1}{16}(1-\cos (4\omega t))##.

Any ideas?

http://ift.tt/1iWksPb

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